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Glossary of Internet Terms

Kids’ and teens’ text messages are hard to understand at the first sight. Children try to simplify their text conversations, make them shorter, and waste less time on typing. On the other hand, they tend to make messaging secret and hide its actual meaning from parents.

What sets alarm bells ringing is online abusers, who use the same methods to get into kids’ confidence. That’s why you as a parent should learn what all these slang words mean to prevent your children from Internet threats and stranger danger. Especially those used for sexting, online dating, drug abuse, cyberbullying, and online predators’ attacks.

  • Common Slang Terms

    Below you’ll find the list of the most popular terms and abbreviations teenagers use while chatting online or writing text messages. Have a look and try to keep them in mind to know whether your kid is hiding something from you.

    • 4Q – F*** You
    • 143 / 459 – I Love You
    • 1432 – I Love You Too
    • 182 – I Hate You
    • ASL (R/P) – Age Sex Location (Race / Picture)
    • ADR – Address
    • BBL – Be Back Later
    • BF/GF – Boyfriend / Girlfriend
    • BRB – Be Right Back
    • Broken – Alcohol Hungover
    • C-P – Sleepy
    • CD9 – Code 9 – means Parents Are Around
    • CMB – Call Me Back
    • CUNS – See You in School
    • DIY – Do It Yourself
    • DOC - Drug of Choice
    • FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions
    • FYI – For Your Information
    • F2F – Face-to-Face, face time
    • FOAF – Friend of a Friend
    • FML – F*ck My Life
    • GNOC – Get Naked on Cam (webcam)
    • GTG – Got to Go
    • GTFA – Google The F*cking Answer
    • HAK – Hugs and Kisses
    • HMU – Hit Me Up
    • IDK – I Do Not Know
    • IDC – I Don’t Care
    • ITA/D – I Totally Agree/Disagree
    • J/K – Just Kidding
    • KK – Okay
    • KOTL – Kiss on the Lips
    • KFY / K4Y – Kiss For You
    • KPC – Keeping Parents Clueless
    • KWIM – Know what I mean?
    • (L)MIRL – (Lets) meet in real life
    • LOL – Laugh Out Loud / Lots of Laugh
    • L&R – Love and respect
    • LHS – Let's Have Sex
    • LMIRL – Let's Meet In Real Life
    • mmk – Mmm…okay
    • MorF – Male or Female
    • MOS – Mom over Shoulder
    • MYT – Meet You There
    • NSFW – Not Safe for Work
    • NSFL – Not Safe for Life
    • NGH – Not Gonna Happen
    • NMP – Not My Problem
    • NBD – No Big Deal
    • NAGI – Not A Good Idea
    • NIFOC – Naked in Front of Computer
    • Noob – Newbie - often an refers to someone who doesn't know a lot about something
    • NMU – Not much, you?
    • P911 / 911 – Parent Emergency
    • PAW – Parents are watching
    • PITA – Pain in the A*s
    • PIR – Parent in Room
    • P&C – Private and Confidential
    • POS – Parent over Shoulder
    • PRON – Porn
    • PRW – Parents Are Watching
    • PAL – Parents Are Listening / Peace and Love
    • SOL – Sh** Out of Luck
    • S2R – Send To Receive (pictures)
    • TDTM – Talk Dirty To Me
    • TWD – Texting While Driving
    • VSF – Very Sad Face
    • W/E – Whatever
    • WTF – What the F*ck?
    • WDYM – What Do You Mean?
    • WRUD – What Are You Doing?
    • WTH – What The Hell?
  • Sexting Slang Terms

    SSexting refers to sending messages with sexual content, primarily via SMS, IM chats, and online communication. View and remember the following list of the most widely used sexting terms to prevent your kids from online predators and other possible dangers on the Web.

    • 1174 – Nude Club / Party Meet-Up
    • 53X – Sex
    • 8 – Oral Sex
    • ASLP – Age, Sex, Location, and a Picture Request
    • CD9 / Code 9 – Parent / Adult around
    • CD99 / Code 99 – Parents Are Gone
    • cu46 – See You for Sex
    • DUM – Do You Masturbate?
    • FMH – F*ck Me Harder
    • GNOC – Get Naked On Cam
    • GNRN – Get Naked Right Now
    • GTFO – Get the F* Out
    • GYPO – Get Your Pants Off
    • IIT – Is It Tight?
    • IPN – I'm posting naked
    • IWS – I Want Sex
    • IWSN – I want sex now
    • JO – Jerk Off
    • LH6 – Let's Have Sex
    • MEGO – My Eyes are Glazing Over
    • MOOS – Member of the Opposite Sex
    • MorF – Male or Female
    • MOSS – Member(s) Of the Same Sex
    • MPFB - My Personal F*** Buddy
    • NALOPKT – Not A Lot of People Know This
    • NIFOC – Naked In Front Of Computer
    • PAW – Parents Are Watching
    • PIR – Parent in Room
    • POS – Parent over Shoulder
    • Q2C – Quick to Come
    • RU/18 – Are You Over 18?
    • RU18 – Are You 18?
    • RUH – Are You Horny?
    • S2R – Send To Receive
    • SorG – Straight or Gay?
    • Sugarpic – Sexy picture
    • TDTM – Talk Dirty To Me
    • THOT – Slamming a girl, as in "that hoe over there"
    • WTTP – Want to trade pics?
    • WUF – Where You From
    • WYCM – Will You Call Me?
    • WYRN – What's Your Real Name?
    • YWS – You Want Sex
  • Drug Slang Terms

    Below you’ll find the list of the most popular illicit drugs and their street names. Bear them in mind to stay aware if your kids use any of them. If they do, consider that they are a footstep from possible danger. Prevent your children from using drugs before it’s too late.

    • Blow, C, candy, coke, do a line, freeze, girl, happy dust, Mama coca, mojo, monster, nose, pimp, shot, smoking gun, snow, sugar, sweet stuff, and white powder.

    • Base, beat, blast, casper, chalk, devil drug, gravel, hardball, hell, kryptonite, love, moonrocks, rock, scrabble, stones and tornado.

    • Backwards, blue heavens, downie, drowsy high, green dragons, idiot pills, joy juice, M&M, no worries, peanut, rainbows, red bullets, stoppers, stumbler, tooles and yellow.

    • Apache, China girl, China town, dance fever, friend, goodfellas, great bear, he-man, jackpot, king ivory, murder 8, poison, tango and cash and TNT.

    • Caps, cherry meth, ever clear, easy lay, fantasy, G, G-riffic, gamma hydrate, Georgia home boy, grievous bodily harm, liquid ecstasy, liquid X, soap and sodium oxybate.

    • Aunt Hazel, big H, black pearl, brown sugar, capital H, charley, china white, dope, good horse, H, hard stuff, hero, heroina, little boy, mud, perfect high, smack, stuff and tar.

    • Air blast, bolt, boppers, bullet bolt, climax, discorama, hardware, heart-on, highball, honey oil, huff, laughing gas, medusa, moon gas, satan’s secret, thrust and whiteout.

    • Bump, cat killer, cat valium, fort dodge, green, honey oil, jet, K, ket, kit kat, psychedelic heroin, purple, special “K”, special la coke, super acid, super C and vitamin K.

    • A, Acid, black star, blotter, boomers, cubes, Elvis, golden dragon, L, microdot, paper acid, pink robots, superman, twenty-five, yellow sunshine and ying yang.

    • 420, Aunt Mary, baby, bobby, boom, chira, chronic, ditch, ganja, grass, greens, hash, herb, Mary Jane, nigra, Pot, reefer, rip, root, skunk, stack, torch, weed and zambi.

    • Adam, bean, blue kisses, clarity, club drug, disco biscuits, E, ecstasy, hug drug, love drug, lover’s speed, Mercedes, Molly, New Yorkers, peace, roll, white dove, X and XTC.

    • Beans, buttons, cactus, cactus buttons, cactus head, chief, love trip, mesc, mescal, mezc, moon, peyote and topi.

    • Beannies, blue devils, chalk, CR, crank, crystal, crystal meth, fast, granulated orange, ice, meth, Mexican crack, pink, rock, speckled birds, speed, tina and yellow powder.

    • Bathtub speed, Cadillac express, cat, crank, ephedrone, gagers, go-fast, goob, qat, slick superspeed, star, the C, tweeker, wild cat and wonder star.

    • Ah-pen-yen, aunti, big O, black stuff, Chinese tobacco, chocolate, dopium, dover’s deck, dream gun, hard stuff, hocus, joy plant, O, ope, pin yen, toxy and zero.

    • Angel dust, belladonna, black whack, CJ, cliffhanger, crystal joint, Detroit pink, elephant tranquilizer, hog, magic, Peter Pan, sheets, soma, TAC, trank, white horizon and zoom.

    • Boomers, god’s flesh, little smoke, magic mushroom, Mexican mushrooms, mushrooms, musk, sherm, shrooms, silly putty and simple simon.

    • Crackers, one and ones, pharming, poor man’s heroin, R-ball, ritz an ts, set, skippy, speedball, ts and ritz, ts and rs, vitamin R and west coast.

    • Circles, forget-me pill, la rocha, lunch money drug, Mexican valium, pingus, R2, Reynolds, roche, roofies, rope, ruffles and wolfies.

    • Abolic, anadrol, arnolds, bolasterone, dihydrolone, equipose, gym candy, juice, methyl testosterone, proviron, pumpers, stackers, therobolin, weight trainers and winstrol V.

  • Online Dating Slang Terms

    Below you’ll find the list of terms commonly used in online dating. Have a look at them and keep in mind. Check if your children use any of them. Do not let strangers or online predators contact your kids with inappropriate offers. Prevent danger before it happens.

    • BBW – Big Beautiful Woman
    • BDSM – Bondage/Discipline/Sadomasochism
    • Bi – Bisexual
    • C – Christian
    • CPL – Couple
    • D – Divorced
    • D&D free or D/D free – Drug and disease free
    • DTE – Down to earth
    • F2F – Face to Face
    • FtM – Female-To-Male Transgendered
    • G – Gay
    • GBM – Gay Black Male
    • G/L/B/T or GLBT – Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgendered
    • GSOH – Good Sense of Humor
    • GWM – Gay White Male
    • H – Hispanic
    • HNG – Horny Net Geek
    • HWP – Height/Weight Proportionate
    • IR – Interracial
    • IRL – In Real Life
    • ISO – In Search Of
    • J – Jewish
    • K – Kids
    • L – Lesbian
    • LD – Light Drinker
    • LDR – Long Distance Relationship
    • LS –Light Smoker
    • M – Male
    • MBA – Married but Available
    • MBC – Married Black Couple
    • MM – Marriage minded
    • MoF – Male or female
    • MSM – Men Seeking Men or Men Who Have Sex with Men
    • MSW – Men Seeking Women
    • MtF – Male-to-female Transgendered
    • MWC – Married White Couple
    • NBM – Never Been Married
    • ND or N/D – Non-Drinker, No Drinking or No Drugs
    • NK or N/K – No Kids
    • NS or N/S – Non-Smoker
    • P – Professional or Parent
    • NRE – New Relationship Energy
    • RL – Real Life, i.e. Not Online
    • S – Single
    • SBF – Single Black Female
    • SBiF – Single bisexual Female
    • SBM – Single Black Male
    • SGL – Single
    • SI – Similar Interests
    • SO – Significant Other
    • STR – Straight
    • SWF – Single White Female
    • SWM – Single White Male
    • TG – Transgendered
    • TS – Transsexual
    • TV – Transvestite
    • VBD – Very Bad Date
    • W – Widowed or White
    • w/ – With
  • Technical Online Terms

    • PC – personal computer.
    • OS – operating system – special software, which manages hardware or any computer, smartphone or tablet. Popular operating systems: Apple iOS (or simply iOS), Android, Blackberry, Windows.
    • Social Media (Network) – online services, which allow their users to create personal profiles (accounts) with any personal data as well as share and exchange information (including multimedia files) via the Internet. Popular social media: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google Plus+, Tumblr, Flickr, Vine.
    • GPS – the Global Positioning System – a satellite navigation system based in space, which provides location and time information in all weather conditions, anywhere on or near the Earth.
    • Mobile Application (Mobile App or simply App) – a special computer program designed to run on smartphones, tablets, and other mobile devices. E.g.: Pumpic is a mobile app designed for parental control and remote monitoring.
    • Browser (Web Browser) – a special program (application), which allows you to view and use any information from the Internet. Popular browsers: Safari, Google Chrome, Opera, Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox.
    • SMS – short message service – a text messaging service component of a phone. SMS also refers to a text message itself.
    • IM chat – instant messenger – a kind of an online chat, which provides real-time text transmission over the Internet. Popular IM chats: Viber, WhatsApp, Skype, Kik, Facebook Messenger.
    • Control Panel – computer user interface, which gives a user control of software and hardware features. Pumpic Control Panel allows you to receive the information sent from your kids’ devices: calls data, text message content, locations, etc., and view it on your personal computer.
    • Compatibility – the ability of software (applications) to be run on a particular device. E.g.: if your smartphone or tablet is compatible with Pumpic, it means that you can download and use the app on your device.
    • Search Engine – special software designed and integrated into a web browser to search information on the web. Popular search engines: Google, Bing, Yahoo, Ask.
  • Popular Apps & Messengers

    Below you’ll find the list of the most popular instant messengers among kids and teenagers. All of them provide communication benefits and connect people across the world. However, these online chats are supposed to be used by 12+ or even 17+ users. They bear real danger for children like sexting, online predators’ attacks, cyberbullying, etc. That’s why parents must know and control instant messengers their children use.

    • SkypeWhy popular:
      • allows free calls, personal and group messages, and video calls;
      • conference calls with up to 9 people, forwarded calls
      Why dangerous:
      • your children might be contacted by any stranger with any intentions;
      • an opportunity for cyberbullies and online predators to reach their victims;
      • SkypeMe mode allows anyone to see that you are ready to chat and contact easily.
    • KikWhy popular:
      • allows online texting and photo sharing;
      • private and group text conversations are available as well.
      Why dangerous:
      • if someone knows your username or email, he or she might contact you easily
        (children tend to share their emails and usernames on Facebook);
      • created for 17+ adults and thus, the access is restricted for children;
      • an opportunity for cyberbullies and online predators to reach their victims;
      • might be used for requesting nude photos, sharing sexual experience.
    • SnapchatWhy popular:
      • allows sharing photos and video files;
      • lets users set a time limit on when a pic or video disappears from online.
      Why dangerous:
      • photos and videos are actually not deleted; what goes online, remains there forever;
      • children suppose that their pics and videos will be deleted soon and thus, tend to share inappropriate content (sexual, nude, embarrassing, sexting);
      • a user can make a screenshot to save a photo before it disappears.
    • Burn NoteWhy popular:
      • limited to text messaging and thus, is simple in use;
      • deletes messages after a set time period.
      Why dangerous:
      • an opportunity for cyberbullies to reach their victims;
      • children tend to send each other messages with offensive or sexual content;
      • kids think they will get away with sending inappropriate messages as they will be erased soon;
      • anyone can receive a Burn Note message even without having an account.
    • SlingshotWhy popular:
      • the app comes from Facebook;
      • allows sharing photos and video files;
      • lets users set a time limit on when a pic or video disappears from online;
      • ability to draw on a photo and make posts more creative;
      • before sending a file, one must first send a shot of his or her own.
      Why dangerous:
      • an opportunity for cyberbullies and online predators to reach their victims;
      • doesn’t require a Facebook account and thus, might be used by anyone;
      • when registering, one must point a Facebook account or a phone number;
      • shows a user’s city, date, and time, until location services disabled.
    • TinderWhy popular:
      • created for hooking and dating;
      • allows finding potential hook-ups via GPS;
      • takes information from users’ Facebook profiles.
      Why dangerous:
      • an opportunity for cyberbullies and online predators to reach their victims;
      • created for hooking up and thus, it is not the right place for the under-18;
      • the app shows Facebook photos and in addition your exact location;
      • it is a known source where older males try to match with much younger girls.
    • VineWhy popular:
      • allows posting short 6-second videos.
      Why dangerous:
      • sexually explicit videos and porn might appear in the feed;
      • inappropriate content might be found easily through the search line;
      • online predators use the app to find teens and track their location.
    • YikYakWhy popular:
      • it is anonymous and doesn’t require creating a profile or account;
      • allows sharing comments with nearest 500 people in 1-5 mile radius.
      Why dangerous:
      • an opportunity for cyberbullies to attack children anonymously;
      • users know they will get away with offensive comments or explicit content;
      • this particular app causes many problems in schools across the USA.
    • Ask.fmWhy popular:
      • allows asking and answering user questions anonymously.
      Why dangerous:
      • cyberbullies and online predators use the app to attack kids;
      • many answers to kids’ questions are mean, angry, and sexually explicit.
  • Emojis & Emoticons

    One may wonder, where can be the harm of a cute smile :) At first sight, all these emojis and emoticons may seem honeyed nothings, however, even they happen to become a tool for offence and bullying.

    There is no point in showing the entire list of all possible smiles that might be used to bring about harm. There are too many of them. Literally, all of them, if combined in a particular way, might appear as offensive ones. Instead, let’s give an example from a real life situation.

    1. In South California, two men were accused of sending threatening emoticons to another person. The emoticons pictured a closed fist, an “L-shaped” hand gesture resembling a gun, and an ambulance. The situation was enhanced by the fact that the two men had a bad record and at the same time previously tried to assault the addressee of the mentioned emoticons at his house. If convicted, the two offenders will face up to five years in prison.
    2. A teenager from Brooklyn was accused of a terroristic threat because of his Facebook status. The boy used emojis and pictured a police officer with a gun near the head. At the same time, there were no verbal threats, only emoticons. He was charged 7 years in custody, but ultimately the jury overturned conviction. Of course, that probably was too much as for emojis and a teenager. However, it once again means that one can be arrested and sentenced for emoticons.