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Kids' Phone Safety Blog

Australian Government Leads the Way against Cyberbullying

August 21, 2015

Online bullying is a known danger children face worldwide these days. Meanwhile the rest of the globe counts statistic data horrifying of the results, the government of Australia takes action fighting against the issue by removing humiliating posts from social networks on their own.

From now on, the Office of the Children’s e-Safety Commissioner calling itself a “one-stop-shop” for online safety is going to work with parents and kids in cooperation with social media and other hubs known for cyberbullying to exterminate the danger completely and change the entire Internet culture.

How the Anti-Bullying Program Works

  1. Before complaining to the office, an underage victim is recommended to block, unfriend, or unfollow an offender and talk to an adult he or she trusts.
  2. Right after, a trusted adult should inform a service (social network) and ask it to delete humiliating content.
  3. If the post is not deleted within 48 hours, all evidence should be collected carefully (links, screenshots etc.) and provided to the office via the cyberbullying-complaint form on esafety.gov.au.
  4. The office will contact service representatives with a demand to remove the offensive content.

To tighten the policy, the Australian government has established two tiers for online services. If a social network or any other web source doesn’t become a part of one of the tiers and refuses to cooperate with the office, it will be brought into civil penalties with $17,000 fine for each day that offensive materials remain on the site.

Importantly, the main purpose of the office is not to fine social services, but to work jointly and softly to exterminate cyberbullying as such. Twitter, Facebook, Yahoo7 Groups, and Flickr have already become members of Tier 1 against cyberbullying ready to cooperate and protect kids on the web.


All these efforts of the Aussie government to fight cyberbullying at the domestic level are a good experience for many countries and societies at struggle with the issue. However, only time can show how effective these methods will be. The forbidden fruit is sweet enough for cyberbullying to shift to other web services. Hopefully, the program will show positive results and inspire the rest of the world.

There is one more difficulty on the way to success of the program. Kids are afraid of cyberbullies. Most of them are afraid so much that won’t tell parents about it at any price.

Statistically, 1 in 5 Australian children are bullied online each year. Only 1 in 3 of them inform parents. That’s why parents should take action and reveal cyberbullying on their own. And that’s where Pumpic mobile monitoring app comes to the rescue. It allows tracking each text message sent or received as well as photos shared. Thus, parents can follow kids’ online activities and find out if their children are cyberbullied at early stages.

Pumpic keeps your eyes open!

Rachel Fowlers
Rachel Flowers is a journalist with a big passion for technologies. She has recently graduated from San Francisco State University and sees herself as a freelance writer. She enjoys blogging about computer and mobile technologies as well as different software. In her free time, she learns coding and foreign languages. Contact .
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