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Kids' Phone Safety Blog

Quiz for Parents: Are Your Kids Smartphone Addicted?

September 2, 2016
Pumpic quiz

The use of mobile devices by kids is a recognized issue of today. According to Pew Research Center smartphone usage statistics, almost 90% of teens own or have an access to a smartphone. Another survey by Rawhide reveals that kids spend on average 6,3 hours a day on phones and tablets. The Internet, messaging, and social media where kids communicate with each other, share photos, videos, or just scroll down the feed have stolen children’s attention and captured their lives. Many adolescents become dependent on smartphones, other ones – literally addicted.

The Pumpic team has drawn up a smartphone addiction test for parents to estimate how phone-dependent your children are. If your result hits a red level, it is time for you to take action and pass your kid of the dangerous point.


Is your kid smartphone dependent

Source: southslopepediatrics.com

Read the quiz statements below and answer “Yes” or “No” to each of them. Every “Yes” gives you one credit, meanwhile “No” equals zero. Afterward, you will need to put all your credits together and evaluate your kid’s smartphone-dependence according to the results.

  1. Your kid gets angry or upset when you take away his/her smartphone.
  2. Your kid starts to act up or refuses to do anything until you give his/her smartphone back.
  3. Your kid gets nervous or depressed when there is no Internet signal.
  4. The only way to make your kid do anything is to take away his/her smartphone.
  5. If your kid has spare time, he/she spends it with a smartphone in hands.
  6. Your kid checks his/her smartphone very often.
  7. Your kid gets nervous or depressed when there’s no reception of cellular service.
  8. Your kid acts weird or becomes angry when no one calls him/her, sends messages, or replies to comments.
  9. Your kid gets angry when a battery of his/her smartphone is running out.
  10. Your kid doesn’t know what to do during free hours without a smartphone.
  11. Your kid stops interacting with his/her friends and other people if a smartphone is unavailable.
  12. Your kid gets angry or depressed if you forbid him/her to play mobile games or check social networks at some particular moments.
  13. Your kid has troubles with teachers at school due to frequent smartphone use during the class.
  14. Your kid starts acting weird, gets angry, or depressed if he/she knows that friends can’t reach him/her on a smartphone.
  15. Your kid realizes that he/she will be punished, but still, breaks family rules of the Internet access and smartphone use.
  16. Your kid would get nervous and refuse to go if you sent him/her somewhere (e.g. to a camp) without a smartphone.
  17. Your kid prefers mobile games, social networks, and other smartphone activities to going out and playing with friends outside.
  18. All of your kid’s activities (including homework and spare time spending) are mainly connected with a smartphone.
  19. Your kid checks his/her smartphone before going to bed.
  20. The first thing your kid does after waking up is checking his/her smartphone.

Done? Now sum up your credits (1 for each “Yes” and 0 for each “No”), and compare them with the results below.

0-5 credits – your kid is not smartphone-dependent. He/she uses a smartphone as often as most people do and you’ve got nothing to worry about. However, keep your eyes open, since the situation may change significantly as your kid grows up.

5-10 credits – your kid has mild smartphone dependency. He/she gets a little anxious when forgets a phone at home for a day or happens to get stuck somewhere without WiFi, but the tension isn’t too bothering. At the same time, you might want to consider trying to cut back on your kid’s smartphone usage – gently and unobtrusively (e.g., keeping gadgets out of sight to break the habit of automatically checking them out).

10-15 credits – your kid spends too much time on his/her smartphone, and you’d better take action and turn him/her into some other activities. Check his/her success level at school, spend more time with your kid, try to talk and find out his/her interests, maybe it is time to send your child to a music school or sports club. Applying parental control will be of help, too. It will let you monitor how often he/she uses a smartphone and limit the use if needed.

15-20 credits – chances are your kid is smartphone-dependent or even addicted. He/she probably has no interests in daily life aside from playing mobile games or deepening into an online world. It is time for you to take reasonable actions and put the child on the right track. Parental control is strongly recommended here. You should limit his/her smartphone use to a minimum and monitor if he/she breaks your rules. Don’t ever leave your child one on one with this issue – he/she does need your help even though not realizing it!

What Does Statistics Say?

Statistically, about 62% of parents’ answers come to the second and third categories (5-15 credits). Meanwhile 28% fall in the red area (15-20 credits), where measures of restriction and parental control are required. And only 10% of children appear to be free of smartphone addiction (0-5 credits).


smartphone dependency diagramm

Source: Pumpic.com

Someone would probably call such situation with the use of smartphones an ordinary course of modern living. However, it is not supposed to be this way. Children should grow up in a healthy environment and explore this world as it is, not through a smartphone screen. They should feel the rain outside, enjoy the sunlight, and raise some bumps to live the life to the fullest.

Thus, now, when you know the level of your kids’ mobile device dependency, you might want to check out our article on the best ways to fight smartphone addiction.

Share your results with us in comments!

Rachel Fowlers
Rachel Flowers is a journalist with a big passion for technologies. She has recently graduated from San Francisco State University and sees herself as a freelance writer. She enjoys blogging about computer and mobile technologies as well as different software. In her free time, she learns coding and foreign languages. Contact .
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